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Brooklyn Today for April 10

John Madden. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle


Good morning. Today is the 98th day of the year.

TODAY AT 5 P.M., The Waterfront Museum in Red Hook will be hosting artist, photographer and intrepid traveler Siobhan Wall, author of the "Quiet Travel" series, launching her latest book, “Quiet New York.” She will be giving a presentation on how she came to write the series and what she found particularly inspiring about New York. A book signing will follow the reception. … The New York City Chapter of Young Professionals in Energy is holding a fundraiser to support the efforts of the Brian D. Robertson Memorial Solar Schools Fund at 7 p.m. All funds raised by the event will support the BDR Fund and its mission of getting 20,000 solar systems installed at schools by 2020. … The Brooklyn Children’s Museum will be hosting a fun event called “Bug Out!” at 3:30 p.m. Children will have the opportunity to meet grasshoppers, worms, stick bugs and Madagascar hissing cockroaches.

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NOTABLE PEOPLE born today include the singer-songwriter Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds, sportscaster and Hall of Fame football coach John Madden, actors Steven Seagal and Haley Joel Osment, and author Paul Theroux.

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FRANCES PERKINS was also born today, in 1880. She was the first woman member of a U.S. presidential cabinet. Born in Boston, she was married in 1915 to Paul Caldwell Wilson but used her maiden name in Public life. She was appointed secretary of labor by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933, a post in which she served until 1945. She died in 1965.

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JOSEPH PULITZER was born today in 1847. He was an American journalist and newspaper publisher, and the founder of the Pulitzer Prizes. He was born in Budapest, Hungary, and died in Charleston, S.C., in 1911. Pulitzer Prizes have been awarded annually since 1917.

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ROBERT BURNS WOODWARD was born today in Boston in 1917. He was a Nobel Prize-winning Harvard University science professor whose special field of study was molecular structure of complex organic compounds. Called “one of the most outstanding scientific minds of the century, he died in Cambridge in 1979.

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TODAY IN 1970, the Beatles publicly broke up. In a press release accompanying promotional copies of his new solo album, Paul McCartney announced that he had no plans for working with the Beatles because of “personal differences, business differences, musical differences.” He stated that he didn’t know if the break was temporary or permanent, but the years-long tension in the group coupled with the musicians’ solo work brought about the end of the band that year. McCartney sued to dissolve the Beatles on December 31, 1970, and the group was formally dissolved four years later.

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IT IS Commodore Perry Day, the birth Anniversary of Matthew Calbraith Perry, commodore in the U.S. Navy, and negotiator of first treaty between US and Japan on in1854. He was born in South Kingston, R.I., in 1794. He died in 1858.

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TODAY BEGINS the three-day French Quarter Festival in New Orleans, La. This festival focuses on all that makes the Quarter special—art, antiques, food, music, shopping, lifestyles and the people. Free concerts on 18 stages featuring 800 local musicians, hi8storic patio tours, parade, children’s and other family activities. Estimated attendance is 450,000.

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IT IS National Siblings Day today. A commemorative day to honor, appreciate and celebrate all brothers and sisters, and, in cases of deceased siblings, holding them in memory and recognizing the bond between siblings for the special gift it is. This day was founded by Claudia Evart of New York City through her nonprofit charity, Siblings Day Foundation, to honor the memories of her sister Lisette and brother Alan; they both died from accidents early in their lives. Since 1998, 75 governors have signed proclamations in 44 states recognizing this day. President Clintons and Bush have also issued presidential messages acknowledging this day.

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ON THIS day in 1849, the safety pin was patented by Walter Hunt of New York.

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TODAY IN 1945 the Brooklyn eagle reported that three “milquetoast bandits who intended to hold up a bar…[who] were frightened out of it by the presence of a bulky patron” had been seized the day before by cops who deputized the customer to help make the arrest. “Booked at the Poplar St. police station, the holdup trio said it was the mere size of 265-pound Patty Ganafalo, a professional moving man, which made them reconsider their robbery attempt so many times.” The three bandits had intended a raid on a bar and restaurant at 85 Hudson Ave. in what was then called the Navy Yard District and is now the neighborhood of Vinegar Hill. They pulled up to the place multiple times but were always put off by the sight of Ganafalo at the counter. On the fourth time they pulled up, they met him coming out the door. Their “furtive manner” made him suspicious, and he told the proprietor to call the police. On his way out, he spied them a block or so away, and halted them in their tracks by simulating a pocketed gun. When the patrolman frisked one of the attempted criminals, he was found to have a loaded gun. “They surrendered to Patty without question, they said, because they had believed from the first that he was a detective,” the paper reported. All three were booked on charges of violating the Sullivan Act, a New York State gun-control law that was passed in 1911, and conspiracy to commit robbery.

Special thanks to Chase’s Calendar of Events and the Brooklyn Public Library.

 

April 10, 2014 - 12:00am


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